Technique tutorial: spreading school spirit with cheer

Synchronized spirit | Last year’s junior varsity Cheer Team demonstrates how they pose together in an organized formation while maintaining correct posture and spirited facial expressions during one of their practices.

Synchronized spirit | Last year’s junior varsity Cheer Team demonstrates how they pose together in an organized formation while maintaining correct posture and spirited facial expressions during one of their practices.

“Mustangs, must-angs, everybody, mustangs!” This cheer can be heard from the field, where cheer has been practicing. The fresh new uniforms. The blue and yellow signs and poms waving in the air.  The chatter with teammates. All of it is back, and Cheer has reunited for practices for the first time since March in person. 

One new cheer that is a favorite of the team is the mustang cheer. This cheer can be used in many scenarios such as at basketball games, football games and pep rallies. The cheer includes a variety of steps and chants. First, they yell the cheer and then clap it out for everyone to hear. The claps have two parts, for example “Must, (clap), angs (clap)”.  Then, they add leg and arm movements in addition. Next, the cheer is repeated and more details are added to the choreography. 

“This cheer is fairly easy for us to learn and everyone on the team enjoys doing it,” sophomore Catherine Castellanos said. “It’s very important for the team to be in sync, which can make the  cheer difficult. That’s why it has been great to be practicing in person, we work much better as a team.”            

When doing the mustang cheer, the members space out in their area making a window formation in two rows. After they are spaced out, they start the verbal part of the cheer and continue with the movements. Most of the movements involve stepping to the left, to the right or  moving their arms in synchronized motions. Another part of cheer that is important to the overall routine is posture. Having good posture is important because it makes the team look cleaner as a whole, and makes them look more synchronized. Proper posture is also necessary because it prevents injuries or back problems that the routines can cause if they are not done properly. Being in person helps the team perfect their movements because they can keep each other on the same page. 

“Posture stunting for bases and flyers is really important, because if you don’t have good posture you can really hurt your back,” junior Erin Cu said. “When you’re dancing, it’s also really important to have good posture so we look tight as a team, so we all look a certain way when dancing”. 

Another key part of participating in the routines is synchronization. Specifically with the Mustangs cheer, the cheer looks better when the entire team is in sync. The verbal cheers and physical movements must be done at the same time. Cheer puts much emphasis in building each other up as a team, so they can all work together and be synchronized. 

“To be in sync, it’s important that we all go off each other’s energy on the field, it’s not an individual effort, it’s a team effort,” Cu said. “We try to make sure everyone knows what they are doing, so we can be a good team and be in unison consistently.”

Finally, a vital part of performing is voice projection and facial expressions. Usually, when the cheer team is performing at sports games the audience area is very large, so they each have to be loud but not screaming. Their voice needs to sound positive and not strained. Some members use megaphones to enhance their voice even more. Besides voice projection, facial expressions are also very important for the cheerleaders. Having defined expressions helps them stand out and perform better. One trick the team uses is to lip-sync  their vowels so they appear very excited and active. 

“We’ve been working hard to make sure we are speaking with our chest, and not over-exerting and screaming when we are cheering” Cu said “It takes practice, but our team and coaches are really great lifting each other up and helping one another out.”

By Sofia Majeed, Staff writer
Photo by Sherlene Su



There are no comments

Add yours