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Walnut High School | 400 Pierre Rd. Walnut, Calif. 91789

the hoofprint

Walnut High School | 400 Pierre Rd. Walnut, Calif. 91789

the hoofprint

Walnut High School | 400 Pierre Rd. Walnut, Calif. 91789

Mental health resources offered to students

Students may utilize various during and after school help.
School+psychologist+Robby+Rendon+listens+to+junior+Juliana+Garcia+as+she+seeks+helps.+%E2%80%9CWhen+handling+%5Bproblems%5D%2C+each+person+is+different.+You+should+seek+%5Bprofessional+help%5D+when+your+stress+or+trauma+significantly+deters+you+from+your+life%E2%80%99s+plan%2C%E2%80%9D+Rendon+said.+
Scott Chen
School psychologist Robby Rendon listens to junior Juliana Garcia as she seeks helps. “When handling [problems], each person is different. You should seek [professional help] when your stress or trauma significantly deters you from your life’s plan,” Rendon said.

In recent years, the issue of poor mental health among students has grown to a significant level. According to Mental Health America, 14.83% of youth (age 12-17) in California suffered from at least one major depressive episode in 2023. At Walnut High School, a survey of 139 students shows that 59.7% of students have experienced mental health issues since starting high school.

The district and school have been prioritizing student mental well-being by presenting multiple resources to students. On-campus assistance is provided by Peer Counseling, GLCs or school psychologists. Also, after-school hours counseling is provided through Care Solace, an online and confidential resource that allows students, staff and families to connect with mental healthcare resources at no cost. The school also promotes hotline numbers such as Suicide Prevention, Teen Line, the Trevor Hotline and Our House. 

Data compiled by Peer Counseling shows that the number of students who sought help from Peer Counselors increased after the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the amount of students has been slowly decreasing post pandemic. 

“When you have bad mental health, everything seems fogged down and you’re going to lose the joys in life,” school psychologist Robby Rendon said. “When your mental health isn’t at its strongest, you feel like you aren’t living in the moment and don’t appreciate life for what it can be.”

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Scott Chen, News editor and Advertising
Hi my name is Scott Chen, I'm in the 11th grade, and I'm the News editor and Advertising for The Hoofprint. Outside of The Hoofprint, I am the captain for the boy's varsity tennis team. I can't wait for what is to come this year!
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