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the hoofprint

Walnut High School | 400 Pierre Rd. Walnut, Calif. 91789

the hoofprint

Walnut High School | 400 Pierre Rd. Walnut, Calif. 91789

the hoofprint

Walnut High School | 400 Pierre Rd. Walnut, Calif. 91789

Federal regulations cause excessive food waste

New federal regulations exacerbate food waste crisis, prompting concerns over sustainability for trash.
Daily Waste | Junior Cetrine Deng eats daily school lunch but often throws away the provided snack bags. A lot of food is wasted because the school food may not be what students envision for a good lunch
Stephanie Cheng
Daily Waste | Junior Cetrine Deng eats daily school lunch but often throws away the provided snack bags. “A lot of food is wasted because the school food may not be what students envision for a good lunch

In the past few years, school food waste has grown to an alarming level due to issues with student preference and federal regulations. According to a survey of 145 students, a majority of students throw away school food because the food doesn’t taste good as a result of the Nutrition Services Department being prohibited by federal regulations from frying or using butter and oil on food. In the past, students were allowed to take any lunch item offered to them; however, due to recent regulations, they are now required to take every single item, leading to even more food waste. “It’s not just about us not wanting to give [students] what [they] want. I would love to give [them] what [they] want so this [food waste] can all go away but it’s not up to us. It’s the federal government,” Nutrition Services director Emmalyn Coles said. According to the World Wildlife Fund, American schools waste approximately 530,000 tons of food annually, costing $1.7 billion nationally. The Nutrition Services Department is required to give out five component meals based on federal regulations: meat, grain, fruit, vegetable, and fluid milk. The funding goes toward paying the employees, leaving only a small amount of money to produce meals with five components each. To find a balance between student acceptability rates and federal requirements, the department has collected feedback from students through programs like Student Think Tank and the Superintendent’s Student Advisory Committee. “Our priority definitely is acceptability,” Coles said. “I’d love to hear the ideas and see if we can make something in our program that meets the requirements.”

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About the Contributors
Lydia Chen, Staff writer
Hi, my name is Lydia Chen. I am a freshman staff writer for The Hoofprint. I have been dancing for almost 10 years, and I am currently on the WHS dance team. During my free time, I enjoy watching movies with my family and riding bikes. One fun fact about me is that I am a middle child with one older brother and one younger brother.
Stephanie Cheng, Photo manager and Media editor
Hi, my name is Stephanie Cheng and I am in 11th grade this year! This is my second year as the Hoofprint Photo manager and first year as Media editor. I am also in the Symphonic Orchestra on campus in addition to playing the piano outside of school. In my free time, I enjoy listening to music, going on walks and scrolling Pinterest.
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